My Golang Adventure: A Symphony of Simplicity and Power

Ronald DC
3 min readAug 2, 2023

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Greetings, fellow code enthusiasts! Today, I want to share with you a remarkable journey, a coding adventure into the robust and resourceful world of the Go programming language, also known as Golang. This voyage took me through the beauty of simplicity, the art of error handling, the magic of interfaces, and the speed of concurrency. Let’s embark on this journey together!

Setting Sail: The Go Way

My first encounter with Go was like a breath of fresh air. In a world where many programming languages seem to revel in complexity, Go stood out with its commitment to simplicity and effectiveness. It was a bit like coming home after a long journey — everything just made sense.

One of the first tools that came to my aid was go fmt. This is an ingenious tool that automatically formats Go source code. It's like having a personal assistant that ensures your code is always neatly formatted and adheres to Go's syntax norms, making your code clean, consistent, and easy to read.

package main

import "fmt"
func main() {
fmt.Println("Hello, Golang!")
}

Charting the Course: Error Handling in Go

Sailing into deeper waters, I encountered Go’s unique approach to error handling. Unlike other languages that employ exceptions, Go uses an explicit error return value. This was a revelation — no more try-catch blocks, just simple, clear error handling.

Here’s an example where I’m trying to create an Employee instance. If the age is below 18, an error is returned instead.

package main

import (
"fmt"
"errors"
)
type Employee struct {
name string
age int
}
func NewEmployee(name string, age int) (*Employee, error) {
if age < 18 {
return nil, errors.New("age must be above 18")
}
return &Employee{name: name, age: age}, nil
}
func main() {
employee, err := NewEmployee("John Doe", 17)
if err != nil {
fmt.Printf("Error creating employee: %s\n", err)
return
}
fmt.Printf("Employee created successfully: %+v\n", employee)
}

Discovering New Lands: Interfaces and Types in Go

One of my favorite parts of the journey was discovering Go’s approach to interfaces and types. Go encourages us to think in terms of what actions our objects can perform, rather than what data they can hold.

In the following example, I have defined two shapes: Circle and Square. Instead of focusing on their properties, I’ve focused on a common action they can perform: calculating their area.

package main

import (
"fmt"
"math"
)
type Circle struct {
radius float64
}
type Square struct {
side float64
}
type Shape interface {
area() float64
}
func (c Circle) area() float64 {
return math.Pi * c.radius * c.radius
}
func (s Square) area() float64 {
return s.side * s.side
}
func getArea(s Shape) float64 {
return s.area()
}
func main() {
circle := Circle{radius: 5}
square := Square{side: 4}
fmt.Println("Area of Circle: ", getArea(circle))
fmt.Println("Area of Square: ", getArea(square))
}

Riding the Waves: Concurrency in Go

The high point of my journey with Go was discovering its built-in support for concurrent programming. With goroutines and channels, Go makes it surprisingly easy to design concurrent programs that are efficient and easy to understand.

In the following example, I have two functions that print messages. By using the keyword ‘go’ in front of one of them, I’ve managed to execute it concurrently, making the program much faster and efficient.

package main

import (
"fmt"
"time"
)
func say(s string) {
for i := 0; i < 5; i++ {
time.Sleep(100 * time.Millisecond)
fmt.Println(s)
}
}
func main() {
go say("world") // This will run concurrently
say("hello") // This will run sequentially
}

Safe Harbor: Reflecting on the Journey

As I look back on my Golang voyage, I see a journey filled with learning, discovery, and growth. The simplicity and power of Go, its unique approach to error handling, interfaces, and concurrency, all combine to make it an incredibly potent language for modern software development.

If you’re standing on the shore, contemplating whether to embark on your own Golang adventure, I encourage you to set sail. The sea of Go is full of challenges and rewards, and the journey is as enlightening as the destination.

Remember, the art of programming, much like any art, is not about reaching a destination. It’s about the journey, the learning, the joy of discovery, and the satisfaction of creating something meaningful. So, set sail and enjoy the voyage. Happy coding!

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Ronald DC

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